Stop Apples From Turning Brown | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food TIP OF THE DAY: Stop Apples From Turning Brown – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
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TIP OF THE DAY: Stop Apples From Turning Brown

How do you keep a sliced apple from turning brown?

(Here’s why apples turn brown.)

Our grandmother dipped the slices into a solution of lemon juice and water. But the experts at the U.S. Apple Association recommend fortified apple juice, a better alternative not available to Granny (or to Mom, either).

The vitamin C that is used to fortify apple juice contains the same ascorbic acid as lemon juice. And it maintains the flavor.

So toss those apple slices into a bowl of fortified apple juice until you’re ready to serve or use them. There’s no need to toss out the apple juice: Drink it!

Pick The Right Apple

As with all fruits and vegetables, each cultivar (variety) has unique properties. In the case of apples, some varieties brown more quickly than others. So the second part of the tip is to look for “slicing apples” with better browning qualities.

  • Faster-to-brown apples include Delicious, Fuji, Gravenstein and McIntosh.
  • Slower-to-brown varieties include Granny Smith, Honeycrisp and Pink Lady.
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    If you want to serve apple slices, or keep them from browning as you prepare a pie, use this tip. Photo courtesy U.S. Apple Association.

     
    As a fun “snacking game” for kids, purchase several different varieties of apple, slice them and have the kids make a time sheet and record exactly when they start to turn brown. As soon as that happens, they can eat the just-turning-brown slices and keep monitoring the rest.

    This may become moot in the future. Okanagan Specialty Fruits, a biotechnology company in British Columbia, has genetically engineered apples so the flesh won’t brown.

    However, as a genetically modified organism (GMO), the cultivar is currently seeking USDA approval, which can take years.

    Although some consumers steer clear of GMOs, there is overwhelming evidence that GMOs are safe.

    GMO tomatoes and grapes, for example, are already in supermarkets.

      




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