Tequila Cazadores Limited Edition Bottle El Dia De Los Muertos | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food FOOD FUN: Collectible Tequila Cazadores Bottle – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
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FOOD FUN: Collectible Tequila Cazadores Bottle

Mr. Cartoon Cazadores Tequila
[1] Tequila Cazadores’s limited-edition Mr. Cartoon bottle for El Día de los Muertos (photo courtesy Tequila Cazadores).

Mister Cartoon Skull Bandana

[2] 100% of proceeds from bandana sales go to Topos México earthquake disaster relief (photo courtesy Mister Cartoon).

 

Get ready to add this bottle of tequila to your collection, and to stock up for holiday gifting for Halloween, El Día de los Muertos and Christmas.

Mexican-American artist Mister Cartoon, has created the art for this limited edition bottle of Tequila Cazadores blanco.

It celebrates El Día de los Muertos (The Day of the Dead), a traditional Mexican holiday. The skull illustration honors the memories of lost loved ones.

Since pre-Colombian times, Aztecs and the Mexicans who followed have celebrated El Día de los Muertos, a ritual in which the living remember their departed relatives.

The holiday starts the evening of October 31st through November 2nd (see more below).

To commemorate the release, the artist has also created a set of skull bandanas (photo #2), from which 100% of proceeds of sales will go towards disaster relief in Mexico.
 
 
THE HISTORY OF EL DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS

Celebrated for thousands of years, this Aztec holiday was originally a month-long festival called Mictecacihuatl, The Lady of The Dead.

When the Spanish conquistadors arrived in the 16th century and imposed their Catholic religion, the celebration became joined with All Saints Day, November 1st, and and All Souls Day, November 2nd.

The celebration begins the evening before, October 31st—coincidentally, the Irish-American celebration of All Hallows Eve, Halloween. While people fear the Halloween spirits of the dead, El Día de los Muertos honors the deceased.

  • On November 1st the souls of children that have passed away, known as Día de los Inocentes (Day of the Innocents) or Día de los Angelitos (Day of the Little Angels). .
  • On November 2nd, the adult souls arrive.
  •  
    Graves of the deceased are visited decorated, and families expect a visit from the spirits of loved ones who have passed.

    Celebrants create brightly-colored home altars honoring these family members. They are decorated with ofrendas (offerings), gifts for the dead: candles, sugar skulls (calaveritas), flowers, food and drink, photos, even items of the deceased’s clothing or a child’s toy.

     
    The altar has mixed imagery of both indigenous origin and Catholic influences. It is not an altar of worship but of honor, to welcome the returning spirits to their homes. Here’s more about it.

    The skull imagery dates to the Aztecs, who kept skulls as trophies and used them during rituals.


      




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