Slow Cooker Bone Broth | THE NIBBLE Blog - Adventures In The World Of Fine Food TIP OF THE DAY: Bone Broth From Scratch Or From Scraps – THE NIBBLE Blog – Adventures In The World Of Fine Food
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TIP OF THE DAY: Bone Broth From Scratch Or From Scraps

Bone Broth
[1] In cold, fluey weather, there’s nothing better than a warm cup of bone broth. Here’s the recipe from Pairings & Platings.

Bone Broth
[2] How about a cup of beef bone broth? Here’s the recipe from Emily Goes Keto. NIBBLE tip: Add a splash of sherry.

Bone Broth Scraps
[3] Start with the basics (photo courtesy Pairings And Platings).


Over the last few years, bone broth—made from the bones of beef or poultry—has become the darling of nutritionists, trendy chefs, foodies and the health-conscious. You can buy it from brands like Pacific Organic at the market, get it by the cup for takeout…or you can make your own.

Rich in nutrition, nourishing for body and soul, bone broth has been used by cultures throughout the world for millennia, to consume straight or as cooking stock.

Bone broth was a way our ancestors made use of every part of the animal: the bones, marrow, cartilage, ligaments, tendons with bits of meat, skin, feet. The long period of simmering caused the bones and ligaments to release nutritious and healing compounds.

In addition to healthfulness, bone broth is a soup and stock: a flavorful liquid to which vegetables and other ingredients can be added.

The difference is that while stock can be made in three or four hours, bone broth is simmered for 24 hours or more, extracting the maximum amount of nutrition from the bones.

But worry not about standing over the pot for a day. We have slow cooker bone broth recipes below.

In the midst of a challenging flu season, bone broth is at the ready. Like its cousin, chicken soup, it helps in recovery:

  • Broth: The hearty broth contains vitamins, minerals. Warm liquid can help to improve upper respiratory tract symptoms by providing hydration and stimulating nasal clearance.
  • Carrots, Celery, Onion: These vegetables contain vitamin A, C and other antioxidants that have been known to help build a strong immune system and fight off viruses. They may help the body recover from illness more quickly.
  • Meat scraps: Protein which supports the immune system [source].
    More benefits:

  • Digestion: The gelatin in bone broth is a hydrophilic colloid that attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, thus supporting proper digestion.
  • Pain Reduction: Bone broth contains chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine, the components of joint pain pills. The amino acids arginine, glycine and proline, also present, have anti-inflammatory effects [source].
  • Bone Health. Bone broth contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium and other nutrients that help with healthy bone formation.
  • Vitamins & Minerals: Long simmering releases into the broth minerals in a form—dissolved—that your body can easily absorb: calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon and sulphur.
  • Skin: The collagen and gelatin coat your digestive tract and cushion your joints…and also help plump the skin.

    You can make bone broth from scratch—with purchased bones and bunches of fresh carrots, celery and onions—or from scraps, as Plating And Pairing does, saving up bits and pieces in freezer bags (photo #3).

    You can add herbs, garlic or whatever else you like (we like lots of parsley and dill, and have even used dried chiles). A spoonful of apple cider vinegar helps pull the nutrients out of the bones, without adding any vinegar taste to the broth.

  • Bone Broth From Scraps, from Platings & Pairings
  • Recipe & Video, from Emily Goes Keto
  • Asian-Style Bone Broth Breakfast Soup, from Good Eggs
    Consume the fresh broth within a week. Freeze the extra in 8- to 10-ounce portions to defrost for a cup- or mug-full.


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