THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
Also visit our main website, TheNibble.com.

FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: Better Virgin Marys

January 1st is Bloody Mary Day. But after last night’s celebration, you may be better off with a Virgin Mary. Most Bloody Mary mixes are made to complement vodka and can be very salty. We find it easier to make a mix that can be drunk Virgin Mary-style—spare the vodka and pack in lots of vitamin C. Start with a 32-ounce bottle of tomato juice. Because we love horseradish, we add 2 tablespoons of the prepared variety, as well as 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce, a teaspoon of celery salt and the juice of a fresh lemon or lime. The horseradish makes it plenty spicy, but an alternative is to add 6 drops of hot sauce like Tabasco. Just shake the bottle and serve. (If you don’t like spice, use more Worcestershire, celery salt and lemon juice, then experiment with a drop or two of hot sauce for flavor.) Keep the bottle chilled in the refrigerator—no ice needed to dilute your drink. With 41 calories per 8-ounce glass, add a celery stick for fiber and you’ve got a low-cal snack that has 74% of your daily requirement of vitamin C and 22% of vitamin A. See which tomato juices scored best in our tasting and find more of our favorite juices in the Juices Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine. If you insist upon celebrating Bloody Mary Day, find lots of Bloody Mary recipes in our Cocktails Section. . Bloody Mary

A homemade Virgin Mary tastes even better than a Bloody Mary made with most mixes.

Comments off

PRODUCT REVIEW: Great Zero Calorie Soft Drinks

Hi-Ball Energy Drink
Add some grapefruit juice for an energy spritzer.
  Do your New Year’s resolutions include losing weight? One standby is diet soda. Some people like it, some people endure it. Try these two boutique carbonated drinks: zero-calorie carbonated beverages with great flavor that we previously reviewed. If you haven’t gotten to know them yet, now’s the time. We think they represent the best of their classes. The first class is classic sodas from Boylan’s Bottleworks—Diet Black Cherry, Diet Cane Cola, Diet Creme Soda and Diet Root Beer. The sodas are made with an expensive mixture of sucralose (Splenda) and acesulfame potassium (Ace-K) and all-natural flavors, tastes better than the regular sodas of most manufacturers. Hi-Ball makes energy drinks in the form of flavored club soda with the taurine, guarana, caffeine and the rest of the energizing mix of regular energy drink—a good boost for weary dieters. A huge difference between Hi-Ball and other diet energy drinks is the sparkling, refreshing flavor—Grapefruit, Lemon Lime, Orange and Wild Berry. Read the full review, and find hundreds of other products in the Diet Nibbles section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.
 

Comments off

FOOD TIP OF THE DAY:

Today is National Champagne Day. Most people bring a bottle of Champagne as a gift to New Year’s Eve parties. Add a book about Champagne, and your gift will be remembered long after the bubbles are gone. This is one of our favorites. (Find more of our favorite books in the Books Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.) Happy New Year from all of us at THE NIBBLE!   4000 Champagnes
No one expects to get through all 4,000, but there’s lots of educational information about Champagne itself.
 

Comments off

FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: A More Entertaining New Year

You can spend more time with friends and family in the New Year by entertaining more often and more easily. Don’t focus on a formal event that takes time to plan and costs a lot of money. Think casual, and simply set aside 2 hours a month to catch up with people you don’t see often enough, or with those you’ve met but haven’t had the chance to see again. Make it a regular event and set aside the second Friday evening or third Sunday afternoon of the month, for example. Invite four to eight people over for a mini-tasting: Try different teas, mineral waters, Spanish cheeses, single-origin chocolate bars—whatever you’d like to learn more about. The group will enjoy mixing and discovering new specialty foods; small groups are easier and less expensive to manage and guests mix more easily. THE NIBBLE is full of ideas—almost every food category section has suggestions for tastings. See the Main Nibbles index of 70 categories of yummy foods in THE NIBBLE online magazine—and decide whether to start in alphabetical order (craft beer?) or healthy, low-calorie food for your new year’s resolutions.   Green TeaInvite friends for a green tea tasting party in January and discover a favorite new green tea to pack in the antioxidants all year long. Read more about high antioxidant foods.
 

Comments off

FOOD TIP OF THE DAY: Go Nuts For Fresh Nutmeg

Whole Nutmeg

Whole nutmeg: Once you try it freshly-
grated, you’ll never go back to pre-grated.

  Just as freshly-ground pepper bears no resemblance to the bland, pre-ground powder, freshly-ground nutmeg is a vibrant spice that perks up sweet and savory dishes alike.

We use it to flavor apples and other seasonal fruits (pies, compotes, sautéed sliced fruit), to make cookies and pastries and in custards. We love it in egg dishes and vegetable purées. It’s our favorite seasoning with spinach in any form, and on pasta with broccoli rabe.

For beverages, use it in addition to (or instead of) cinnamon on hot chocolate, coffee, cappuccino, mulled cider, warm milk, cold milk, chocolate milk and of course, eggnog!

While some cooks grate the whole nutmeg against a fine plane kitchen grater, we value our skin and use a nutmeg grinder or mill—the same principle as a peppermill, but accommodating the larger nutmeg, which is the size of an unshelled hazelnut.

If you’ve had the nutmeg for several years, you can check the quality by piercing it with a needle. If the skin pierces slightly and a drop of oil flows out, the nut is still fresh. If the skin won’t pierce, it’s dried out. (See how to check your other spices for freshness.)

The nutmeg is the seed of an evergreen tree fruit. The tree, botanically known as Myristica fragrans, is indigenous to tropical southeast Asia and Australasia. Mace is the milder-tasting dried hull of the nutmeg—the part you peel off to get to the nut.

Comments off



© Copyright 2005-2018 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are copyrighted to their respective owners.