Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
  Sign Up | Contact Us | Email To A Friend | Blog  
Twitter RSS feed [?]













Strawberry Rhubarb Pie
Strawberry rhubarb pie was first made in England around the turn of the 19th century. Photo © Seandnad | Dreamstime.

MENU

  

   

Cookies, Cake & Pastry

Category Main Page
Articles & Reviews

 

Main Nibbles

Articles & Reviews Of Foods
From A To Z

 

Product Reviews

Main Page

Food, Beverages, Books,
News & More

 

 

 

   

 

June 2010

Product Reviews / Main Nibbles / Cookies, Cake & Pastry

Recipe: Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

A Spring Treat: Don’t Miss Rhubarb Season

 

Rhubarb Overview

National Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Day is June 10, but anytime you see fresh rhubarb is the time to make this delicious pie.

Spring is rhubarb season; in North America it grows between April and June.

Technically, rhubarb is a vegetable, a member of the sorrel family (see the difference between fruits and vegetables). Even for a vegetable, it is very tart. Before it was sweetened, it was added to soups (try it in lentil soup!) and sauces—in the Himalayas, in Moroccan tagines and Middle Eastern stews. Be sure to cook only the stems; the leaves are mildly toxic (they contain oxalic acid).

But for most of us, rhubarb needs a sweetener. It’s absolutely delicious as stewed rhubarb, rhubarb ice cream, rhubarb pie and its variation in this recipe, strawberry rhubarb pie. Some people eat the stems raw by dipping them into sugar.

Rhubarb grew wild in northwest China, and was cultivated about 5,000 years ago for medicinal purposes. It made its way west via Turkey and Russia, and was first planted in England by an apothecary in 1777. Properly sweetened, it became popular for jams, sauces and crumbles.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Recipe

This recipe makes a 9" pie. You can use the double pie crust in the recipe or make a lattice top. Or, you can make a meringue lattice: Bake the pie open-face, then pipe on a meringue lattice top. Return the pie to the oven for five minutes or until the meringue browns.

Ingredients For Filling

  • 2 cups rhubarb, cut in 1" pieces
  • 1 cup strawberries, sliced
    (keep thickness similar to rhubarb)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 egg
  • Pie crust

Ingredients For Pie Crust

  • 2 cups pastry flour or 1-3/4 cups
    all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup vegetable shortening or
    lard (or a combination of 1/3 cup
    lard and 1/3 cup butter)
  • Up to to 1/3 cup ice water
  • 9" pie plate
  Rhubarb
Rhubarb is a beautiful vegetable—but don’t eat the leaves (they’re mildly toxic). © Yanyko | Fotolia.

Preparation

  1. Make the crust (if using a prepared crust, skip to step 5). Cut the flour in with the fat, using a pastry blender, a blending fork, the “two knives” method or fingers. Work quickly so that the shortening does not soften. The mixture should be the size of peas.
  2. Using a tablespoon, sprinkle ice water onto the mixture, stirring it with a fork until the consistency enables you to pat the dough lightly into a ball. Do not knead the dough and do not over-handle it. Touch the dough as little as possible to ensure a tender crust.
  3. Divide dough into halves. One half can be slightly larger (for the bottom crust). Wrap the dough in wax paper, plastic wrap or foil and chill for 2 hours or longer—the colder the dough, the less it will stick.
  4. Leaving the top crust dough in the refrigerator, roll out the bottom crust on a pastry board (see options below), pastry cloth, pastry mat or countertop dusted very lightly with flour (too much flour toughens the pastry). Press the ball lightly with a rolling pin to flatten. Roll out from the center. Use quick, light strokes to roll to a 1/8" to 1/4" thickness, an inch larger than the pie pan. Fold in half and gently lift into the pan; do not stretch the dough as you unfold and move it into place. Trim the edge with a scissors, allowing 1/2" for crimping.
  5. Preheat oven to 425°F.
  6. Mix together the sugar, flour and egg. Blend with the chopped rhubarb. Spoon filling into the crust.
  7. Prepare the top crust in the same manner as the bottom crust. Cut a design or a round hole with a small cookie cutter; then brush the edge of the bottom crust with water. Fold the top crust per Step 4 and place it atop the filled bottom crust. Trim the edges with a scissors; then crimp the crust with your fingers (or use the tines of a fork). If using a prepared crust, be sure to cut a steam vent.
  8. Bake 40 minutes, until the crust is browned.
  9. Serve warm or at room temperature with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

Find More Pie Recipes

Pastry Boards

Embossed Pastry Board. This
board is embossed with measurement markings that
assist in rolling out the proper
size pie crusts, biscuits, etc.
More information or purchase.
Magic Dough Non-Slip Flexible Pastry Mat. This non-slip mat
is less expensive than a board.
The markings make it easy to
roll the dough to size. More information or purchase.
Marble Pastry Board. While the costliest option, marble has the coolest surface so dough won’t stick. A must for rolled cookies (made with cookie cutters). More information or purchase.

 

© Copyright 2005- 2014 Lifestyle Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. All images are the copyright of their respective owners.

 



About Us
Contact Us
Legal
Privacy Policy
Advertise
Media Center
Manufacturers & Retailers
Subscribe
Interact