Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Shop The Nibble Gourmet Market
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed


















Sausages On Grill
Bangers—in the United Kingdom.  To Americans, just sausages on the grill, from Chef Bruce Aidell
MENU

   

   


Fun Food Facts

Main Page

 

 

More Food Fun

Main Page
Fun Facts, Amazing Food,

Projects & More

   

 

Food Fun

Main Page
When You’re Not Eating It,
Have Fun With It

   

 

   

 

November 2005
Updated January 2007

Food Fun / More Food Fun / Fun Food Facts

Lost In Translation

You Say Bangers, And I Say Sausage...

 

A Tongue-in-Cheek Warning About Buying “Exotic British Specialty Foods”

Winston Churchill called the United Kingdom and the United States, “two countries separated by a common language”—and he wasn’t even looking at this grocery list! But pity the poor Americans who pick up some enticingly labeled double cream, Demerera sugar and courgettes, only to find on they’ve brought home nothing more than good old American heavy cream, light brown sugar and zucchini.

Since many specialty food stores stock British imports, we don’t want you to think that you’ve stumbled on a cache of new and exotic foods; or that a romantic experience awaits when you finally lay your hands on something you’ve heard people singing about in Gilbert & Sullivan, like treacle (molasses). On the other hand, it might sound like a dish of collops and capsicum is akin to poison mushrooms—when it’s only meatballs and bell peppers.

Here are some foods common to both nations, found in translation.

In The U.K.
In The U.S.

1. Aubergine

1. Eggplant

2. Bangers

2. Sausage

3. Bap

3. Bun, roll

4. Beetroot

4. Beet

5. Bicarbonate of soda

5. Baking soda

6. Bilberry

6. Blueberry

7. Biscuit mixture

7. Cookie dough

8. Biscuits

8. Crackers, cookies

9. Black cherries

9. Bing cherries

10. Black pudding

10. Blood sausage

11. Blancmange

11. Vanilla pudding

12. Boiling chicken

12. Stewing chicken

13. Broad Beans

13. Fava beans
14. Cake mixture 14. Cake batter
15. Candy floss 15. Cotton candy
16. Capsicum 16. Bell peppers
17. Caster sugar 17. Superfine granulated sugar
18. Chicken cube, beef cube 18. Bouillon cube
19. Chicory 19. Belgian endive
20. Chili 20. Chili pepper
21. Chips 21. French fries
22 Claret 22. Bordeaux
23. Cling film 23. Plastic wrap
24. Cocoa powder 24. Unsweetened cocoa
25. Collops 25. Meatballs
26. Cornish pasty 26. Meat turnover
27. Corn flour 27. Corn starch
28. Courgettes 28. Small zucchini
29. Crisps 29. Potato chips
30. Crystallised fruits 30. Candied fruits
31. Curly endive 31. Chicory
32. Demerera sugar 32. Light brown sugar
33. Digestive biscuit 33. Graham cracker
34. Double cream 34. Heavy cream
35. Dripping 35. Fat from roasted meat
36. Essence 36. Extract
37. Flan 37. Open top pie
38. Fresh vegetables 38. Raw vegetables
39. Forcemeat 39. Stuffing mixture
40. French bean 40. Green bean
41. Gammon 41. Ham
42. Golden syrup 42. Light corn syrup
43. Ground nut oil 43. Peanut oil
44. Haricot beans 44. Navy beans
45. Icing 45. Frosting
46. Icing sugar 46. Powdered sugar, confectioners sugar
47. Jelly 47. Jell-O®, gelatin
48. Joint 48. Beef roast,roast beef
49. Lean bacon 49. Canadian bacon
50. Mange tout or mange-tout*
*possibly because the whole pod is eaten
50. Snow pea/sugar pea/snap pea (Pisum sativum)
51. Marrow 51. Squash, gourd, zucchini
52. Minced meat 52. Ground beef, hamburger
53. “Neat” drink 53. “Straight up” drink
54. Off-license 54. Liquor store
55. Offal 55. Variety meats, organ meats (liver, heart, kidney)
56. Oxford sauce 56. Cumberland sauce
57. Pickled cucumber 57. Dill pickle
58. Pie 58. Meat pie or fruit pie
59. Pig’s trotter 59. Pig’s foot
60. Pine kernels 60. Pine nuts
61. Pips 61. Seeds
62. Plain chocolate 62. Semi-sweet chocolate
63. Plain flour 63. All-purpose flour
64. Pluck (n.) 64. Heart, liver and lungs
65. Porridge 65. Oatmeal
66. Prawn shrimp 66. Shrimp
67. Pudding 67. Dessert
68. Raising agent 68. Leavening agent
69. Rocket 69. Arugula
70. Root ginger 70. Ginger root
71. Rusks 71. Unsweetened zwieback
72. Sack 72. Sweet sherry
73. Scone 73. Baking powder biscuit
74. Semolina 74. Cream of wheat
75. Shandy 75. Beer with lemonade
76. Sherbet fruit 76. Fruit candies covered with powdered sugar
77. Silverside 77. Beef cut from the rump
78. Single cream 78. Half and half
79. Soft brown sugar 79. Light brown sugar
80. Soured cream 80. Cultured sour cream
81. Spring onion 81. Scallion, green onion
82. Stoned 82. Seeded
83. Sultanas 83. Seedless white raisins, golden raisins
84. Sweetshop 84. Candy store
85. Swede 85. Rutabaga, turnip
86. Tinned 86. Canned
87. Treacle 87. Molasses
88. Tunny 88. Tuna
89. Water biscuits 89. Crackers ,matzos
90. Wholemeal 90. Whole wheat, graham

If you’d like to suggest words for the list, click here.

EggplantPerhaps the Brits are correct: aubergine sounds so much more exciting and elegant than eggplant. Photo courtesy of www.5aday.gov.



Related Food Videos:



For more food videos, check out The Nibble's Food Video Collection.


© Copyright 2005-2014 Lifestyle Direct Direct, Inc. All rights reserved. Images are the copyright of their respective owners.

 



About Us
Contact Us
Legal
Privacy Policy
Advertise
Media Center
Manufacturers & Retailers
Subscribe
Interact