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Cracked Mustard SeedsCracked mustard seeds. Photo by Dominic Morel | SXC.
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March 2006
Last Updated May 2012

Product Reviews / Main Nibbles / Condiments

Different Mustard

Mustard Glossary Page 5: Pick A Different Mustard
H, I, J, K & L

 

This is Page 5 of a seven-page mustard glossary. Instead of the same old, same old, pick a different mustard. To visit other pages, click on the black links below. If you’d like to suggest additional words for inclusion, click here. See all of our delicious food glossaries.

 

HERB MUSTARD

Chive, parsley, watercress and other herbs are added to mustard for both flavor and color.

HONEY MUSTARD

A sweet mustard made by adding honey to a base mustard. It can be bought commercially, or made at home by mixing the two ingredients. It is often used as a dip for pretzels and as a sweet base for hors d’oeuvres.

HOT MUSTARD

There are three varieties of mustard seed. The white (also called yellow) mustard seed (Brassica alba) produces a somewhat hot and tangy mustard, but the black (Brassica nigra) and brown (Brassica juncea) varieties are much more hot and pungent, carrying the heat “up the nose” and capable of making eyes water. Chinese mustard is made from the stronger brown mustard seeds, as is Dijon mustard and Colman’s mustard. The mustard seeds themselves are not hot or pungent until they are cracked or ground and mixed with a cold liquid, which effects a chemical reaction between two compounds, myrosin and sinigrin, and creates the hot mustard oil.

  Honey Dijon Mustard
Honey can be added to any type of mustard, such as Maille’s Dijon mustard, above. In fact, you can add a spoonful of honey—or a noncaloric sweetener—to a standard jar of mustard.

HORSERADISH MUSTARD

A zesty mustard made by adding honey to a base mustard. It can be bought commercially or made at home by mixing the two ingredients. It is served with roasts and sandwiches; and added to beef dishes, stews, and casseroles. You can buy it online.

JAPANESE MUSTARD or WASABI
MUSTARD

A condiment served in most Japanese restaurants with sushi and sashimi, usually erroneously thought of as wasabi, or Japanese horseradish root. Japanese mustard is “faux” wasabi: a mixture of mustard, ordinary white horseradish root, cornstarch and food coloring created to approximate the much more costly Wasabia japonica. It is sold in powdered form and reconstituted in tubes, and can be used, as Western mustard, to flavor vinaigrettes, season meats, add to egg dishes, et al. Wasabi mashed potatoes are very popular in gourmet circles. You can purchase a tube of prepared wasabi at Asian markets and online. You can also buy authentic wasabi powder (ground Japanese horseradish root), online. Read about the difference between real and fake wasabi. Read our review of Real Wasabi, a NIBBLE Top Pick Of The Week.

 
Honey can be added to any type of mustard, such as Maille’s Dijon mustard, above. In fact, you can add a spoonful of honey—Photo courtesy Newspaper.li.

 

 

Continue To Page 6: Mustard Types Beginning With M

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